The US gymnastics superstar withdraws from the team event after she left the field to be attended to by the trainer

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Gold medalist Carissa Moore, center, South Africa's Bianca Buitendag, left, Silver medalist, and Japan's Amuro Tsuzuki celebrate on the podium at the Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach, on July 27.
Gold medalist Carissa Moore, center, South Africa’s Bianca Buitendag, left, Silver medalist, and Japan’s Amuro Tsuzuki celebrate on the podium at the Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach, on July 27. Olivier Morin/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Before she won the gold, surfer Carissa Moore said she experienced a “rollercoaster of emotions” after arriving in Japan for the Tokyo Olympics without her family.

“It’s been a crazy couple of days … just trying to figure out the break, find my rhythm, learning how to trust myself without my family here,” said the 28-year-old America after her win on Tuesday.

According to the four-time world champion and world No.1 the gold medal is “quite heavy.”

“I’m very proud and honored,” added Moore. “I feel super blessed, super fortunate. It’s been an incredible experience.”

Moore was born in Oahu, Hawai and it was a Hawaiian — Duke Kahanamoku — who was key to introducing surfing to the world.

A talented athlete, Kahanamoku was the first swimmer to win the Olympic 100m freestyle twice in a row after victory at the Antwerp 1920 Games,

“This was his dream, to have surfing in the Olympics. I hope I made him and my people proud,” said Moore of Kahanamoku.

The 28-year-old said she wished that the people who supported her on her surfing journey were with her.

“I wouldn’t be where I’m today without you guys. I can’t wait to come home and celebrate. Thank you for staying up and cheering for me. It’s not only my friends and family, I have friends and family all over the world. I love you guys,” she said.